Fanzines

A selection of fanzines from the UNB Saint John library's Science Fiction & Fantasy Collection


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Outworlds
Outworlds
A long-running Science Fiction fanzine edited by William Bowers. Bowers was a committed self-publisher whose career lasted from the early 1960s to the late 90s. Outworlds was his second zine (the first was Star*Dust) and it lasted for 70 issues. It contained editorials, poetry, illustrations, criticism, etc. and attracted contributions from professional Science Fiction writers like Poul Anderson and Piers Anthony. In spite of that, it remained a decidedly amateur publication. George R.R. Martin also contributed content to the zine prior to gaining international recognition for his Song of Ice and Fire series of novels. Outworlds was nominated for the Best Fanzine Hugo award in 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, and 1977.
Perihelion
Perihelion
Perihelion, produced by Sam Bellotto, Jr. and Eric M. Jones, was one of the more elaborate Science Fiction/Fantasy fanzines of the 1960s. Many zines from the era were produced using mimeograph machines because of their low cost, but Perihelion was offset printed using a press at Long Island University, where Bellotto was a student. This more costly printing method allowed for the inclusion of highly detailed screend artwork. For instance, Perihelion contained comics by well-known 1960s underground cartoonist Vaughn Bode. It also contained fiction, poetry, and articles. Perihelion was published from 1967 to 1969.
Space And Time
Space And Time
Space and Time was one of the longest lasting Science Fiction/Fantasy fanzines devoted to creative content (fiction, poetry, artwork, comics). It was created in 1966 by John Eiche, Larry Lee, and Gordon Linzner and is still being published in the 2010s. Though it eventually became a professional publication, Space and Time began life as a DIY zine that was produced on mimeograph. Of its original creators, Linzner remained with S&T and experimented with different sizes, print runs, and production methods. Even before it became a professional publication, the zine retained a regular production schedule, a feature that attracted contributors. A large number of creators have contributed work to S&T, some of whom have gone on to make their own zines. Writer/artist Gene Day, for example, was the creator of Dark Fantasy.
Trumpet
Trumpet
Like Perihelion, Trumpet was one of the more elaborate Science Fiction/Fantasy fanzines of the 1960s. Creator Tom Reamy had been part of the Texas DIY publishing scene since the 1950s when he published a zine called Crifanac. Instead of producing Trumpet through inexpensive reproduction methods (like mimeograph), Reamy used comparatively costly lithograph printing so that he could include more visually ambitious elements. He included intricate illustrations, comics, and (for several issues) full color covers. Trumpet featured work by artists such as Vaughn Bode, D. Bruce Berry, Gilbert Shelton, Stephen Fabian, Berni Wrightson, and Hannes Bok. Shelton and Bode were both known for their contributions to the 60s-70s underground comix community. Reamy produced Trumpet from 1965-1969.
Yandro
Yandro
Yandro was a long-running Science Fiction fanzine that was published without significant interruption from 1953 until 1985. It began life as a newsletter for the Eastern Indiana Science Fiction Association (EISFA). Throughout much of its lifespan, Yandro was co-edited by the husband and wife team of Robert "Buck" Coulson and Juanita Coulson. It was produced by mimeograph with a print run of approx. 150 per issue. It was well-received in fan circles and was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine yearly from 1958 to 1967. It won the 1965 Hugo, making Juanita Coulson the first woman to win a major award within the SF fan community. Yandro's content was largely comprised of fiction and reviews. It also contained drawings, one-panel comics, and memorable editorials that often provided insights into the lives of the Coulsons.

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